Comic Book Magazine Files

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finishedoliverboxI found a set of 5 cardboard magazine files at Ikea for $1.50. That’s a deal that can’t be beat, and I was in need of portable storage for my sewing books. So I purchased them knowing I could do something to make them more visually interesting.

I decided to cut cover them in comic book panels. And of course, it was very easy and quick to have a few covered magazine files. Basically, you’ll put your magazine file together, cut out some comic panels, glue them down, and add a final sealing layer of glue to finish.

What you’ll need:

  • Mod Podge or other Decoupage glue (I used glossy)
  • Magazine files like Flyt from Ikea
  • Comic books or magazines for images. The thinner the paper you use the better it will fold and adhere to the box
  • Sponge or paint brush to apply glue

First, you’ll need a comic book to cut your images from. I initially chose Green Arrow and Hulk. Green Arrow because he’s been my favorite for 10 years, and in my zealous collecting I have duplicates of his books from various ages. The Hulk because I raided the dollar comicbin to decoupage a pair of shoes a while back, and I still had some good issues. After I started, the daughter wanted a Captain America box, of course, remember her curtains?Point is pick your favorite character and hit either your duplicates or a cheapbin at the local comic shop, don’t spend very much on this stage, or the project will suddenly be very expensive.

Flip through the book you are cannibalizing to make sure you’ll have enough to cover your box. While I love Ollie, his books had a lot of dark panels that didn’t suit the project, and I had to cut from several to get enough to cover the boxes. The Hulk, on the other hand, pretty much allowed me to retell the story from a single comic, and all of the images came from it. I even had a panel where Betty kisses Hulk. Score! I couldn’t find a good panel of Dinah and Ollie together in the grouping I had. Sniff!

Gather a group of panels together that will line the box.

Gather a group of panels together that will line the box.

These panels are ones I really liked. So I set them aside to highlight the file box.

These panels are ones I really liked. So I set them aside to highlight the file box.

I even laid out the panels in a attractive order over my magazine file before applying the glue.

I even laid out the panels in an attractive order over my magazine file before applying the glue. Overlapping and planning how you will address the edges and corners is a must. I planned on bending around the sides as uneven layers. Of course, I didn’t end up gluing the panels down exactly the way I planned. Oh well!

The comics I used were from the early 1990s and so they were made of newsprint. When glue is applied, the newsprint, and other thin paper, becomes very pliable. It folds well over the edges and around corners nice and flat, but it you want to add dimension it takes to that as well too. Just make sure that when you finish laying your panels down that you go over them one last time with a layer of glue. Once that layer is down add your “standout” panels and glue them down as well. Again covering the paper with glue over the top.

One last layer of Mod Podge gives the box a bit of extra stability and seals all the edges.

One last layer of Mod Podge gives the box a bit of extra stability and seals all the edges.

After the glue has dried, sit back and enjoy your handiwork.

All the glue dried clear and shiny giving the panels a vibrancy that didn't have before.

All the glue dried clear and shiny giving the panels a vibrancy that didn’t have before.

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Kickstarter: Kitchen Overlord’s Illustrated Geek Cookbook

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kitchenoverlordKitchen Overlord’s Illustrated Geek Cookbook looks fun for those who are into geek cooking. I want to check it out. It looks irreverent, creative, and, most important, yummy! Lots of reward levels that can fit into many budgets.

Slow Progress

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This has been a slow week sewing wise for me. I have a stack of projects to work on, and I didn’t start or finish a single one. Early on in the week, I felt the call of the kitchen and have spent most of my time there.

Still, I can’t help but look at the fabric waiting to be transformed and sigh. Mostly because it is sitting on the ironing board and sewing table mocking my laziness. To be honest, I am not even sure what I am going to do with half of it, but I started the week thinking I would figure it out.

Here a small collection of the projects that weren’t this week. I figure the pressure of posting this on my blog will inspire me. And if not, perhaps, I will be motivated to put this stuff away and get new stuff out.

I know all about me, but does anyone else have this problem?

Fabric Review: Wal-mart Cotton and Captain America by Eugene Textiles

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I don’t know about anyone else, but I touch fabric when I am walking through a fabric store. I love the tactile sensations of various textiles against my fingertips. If you do this enough and sew with fabric you’ve been touching, you develop a good sense of how a fabric is going to handle life once it has been washed, dried, cut, and sewn before purchasing it.

So I say this as a person who has developed this sense, and at risk of sounding like a fabric snob: I do not like Wal-mart fabric.

I tell people who are getting into sewing to avoid Walmart fabric if they can. It just doesn’t feel right. There is something weak and cheap about it.

captainamericaeugenetextiles

This is a great pattern. I just wish I could have found more of it.

However, I love my daughter, and she loves Captain America. She wanted Captain America curtains made of a specific fabric for her bedroom; one I had made her a pillow case and tote bag out of last year. Walmart was the only fabric place that still had it in my area, and finding it online was not happening. So I bought it. In the store, it seemed to have a similar body as the previous fabric. I compared it at home, this version was a bit lighter in thread count compared to the last, but for a Spring/Summer weight curtain I decided it will work out fine.

The cotton Captain America fabric, style 19161317 by Eugene Textiles washed well. I may have lost a little of the fabric through washing, but if I did it was less than a quarter-inch. It irons easily. However, you can still see through it when folded in half. The cost was $5.66 a yard.

generic walmart cotton

I purchased three coordinating colors so she could choose the one she liked the best. She chose red.

Against my better judgment, and slight laziness, I purchased coordinating cottons right there. At $2.44 a yard, I had low expectations. Those expectations have been met. Each color lost about at least half-inch through washing and drying. They are very thin and very scratchy to the touch. The dark purple is already pilling.

I would avoid this fabric in the future. However, it will be a nice cheap colored fabric to use in making toiles, so it was not wasted money. Also, with a teenager’s ever-changing tastes, the cost of the fabric is agreeable for what it is being used for.

Final thought: In general, you should always sew with the most expensive fabric of the type you need that you can afford. You’ll get better results and be happier.