Cooking in Thedas: Morrigan’s Wilder Rice

Standard

Alistair_and_Morrigan_bicker_spoiler_alert_I get the impression that when Alistair asks Morrigan whether she can cook, she would rather find poisonous things and feed those to him instead. Still, her knowledge of the wilds plants would give her an advantage over the castle-and-chantry raised Warden. Regardless of her personal feelings she would have to eat as well. I came up with dish by asking the older folks what they remember as being easily sourced wild plants and weeds – one and all they called asparagus an annoying weed. I selected parsley and dill as the complimentary flavors largely based on the fact that if you plant your asparagus in a home garden and you plant parsley and dill on either side, you will have an effective deterrent for many wild creatures.

Morrigan’s Wilder Rice
4 oz. Wild Rice, dry
9 oz. Carrots
12 oz. Asparagus
1/4 cup Parsley, chopped
Fresh Dill, 5-6 sprigs

1. Cook wild rice according to package directions.

I forgot to take a picture of the wild rice cooking. Be aware that wild rice takes about an hour to cook.

I forgot to take a picture of the wild rice cooking. Be aware that wild rice take about an hour to cook.

2. Place asparagus and carrots into a skillet and just cover with water. Bring water to boil to cook the carrots and asparagus. Asparagus will cook completely faster than the carrots.

carrotsandasparagus

You may want to start your carrots sooner than your asparagus. I take my asparagus out, shock it, and then cut it.

3. Remove from pan and rinse. Cut the carrots and asparagus into bite-sized pieces. Return to skillet.

4. Add cooked wild rice to combine.

5. To prepare dill either chop or use spice-mill. Add dill and parsley to skillet.

wilderricecooked

Once all ingredients have been combined, heat on medium-low until warm.

6. Heat until warm.

Serves 4.

Calories: 143.8
Total Fat: .3g
Saturated Fat: .1g
Polyunsaturated Fat: .1g
Monosaturated Fat: 0g
Cholesterol: 0mg
Sodium: 21.3mg
Potassium: 379.9mg
Total Carbohydrate: 29.6g
Dietary Fiber: 4g
Sugars: 1.6g
Protein: 6.6g

Advertisements

Cooking in Thedas: Dalish Salad

Standard

500px-Location-Dalish_Camp_CampfireThe Dalish do not spend time in agricultural pursuits. Instead, they must gather their fruits and vegetables during their travels. This salad incorporates the idea that the Dalish wild source their foods. Experienced wild sourcers could collect the ingredients to make a salad or incorporate local flavors instead. The following recipe is a suggestion and should be adapted to the individual tastes; for example I recommend dandelion greens because they can be picked from pesticide free yards, but personally I find them too bitter to be enjoyable. Each serving should be 1 cup.

Dalish Salad

Purslane, Dandelion Greens, or Spinach
Fennel (anise)
Apple
Strawberries, preferably wild
Leek
Edible Flowers
Fresh Mint
Rosemary

Wash and pat dry all ingredients.

Chop “lettuce” and fennel. Cut your leeks into rings. Slice the strawberries, and cut  apple into bite-sized pieces.

If you have never worked with leeks before, cut up the leeks first and then soak them in water. Leeks grow in sandy soil and the sand permeates the rings quite a bit. Drain thoroughly and pat dry.

If you have never worked with leeks before, cut up the leeks first and then soak them in water. Leeks grow in sandy soil and the sand permeates the rings quite a bit. Drain thoroughly and pat dry.

Fennel is another ingredient that many people may not have encountered before. You want the bulb with the green leafy part. The entire vegetable can be eaten. Though you will want to taste each section to see what you like if you’ve never encountered it before. The green feathery fronds are the part you will often see as dried fennel. The licorice-like flavor will add interest to the salad. You probably will not need the entire bulb, so the rest can be baked in the oven with balsamic vinegar for another vegetable offering.

Fennel is another ingredient that many people may not have encountered before. You want the bulb with the green leafy part. The entire vegetable can be eaten. Though you will want to taste each section to see what you like if you’ve never encountered it before. The green feathery fronds are the part you will often see as dried fennel. The licorice-like flavor will add interest to the salad. You probably will not need the entire bulb, so the rest can be baked in the oven with balsamic vinegar for another vegetable offering.

Of the rosemary, you will only want the leaves. Harvest enough for about one tablespoon.

Pick about 10 leaves of mint. You will want to either ribbon cut this or use a spice-mill to cut it. Doing either of these methods will release the mint more thoroughly into your salad.

Make the Dalish Salad aesthetically pleasing by using a variety of textures and colors.

Make the Dalish Salad aesthetically pleasing by using a variety of textures and colors.

Mix the desired amount of “lettuce,” fennel, leeks, apple, rosemary, and mint together. Arrange strawberries on top. Finish with edible flowers.

If desired, a dressing made from a fruit-infused or plain balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil may be offered, if desired. The ratio is for every 3 tablespoons of oil add 1 tablespoon of vinegar. This will add about 100 calories per serving to your salad.

 

 

Calories: 53
Total Fat: .4 g
Saturated Fat: .1 g
Polyunsaturated Fat: .2 g
Monounsaturated Fat: .1 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 32.0 mg
Potassium: 338.6 mg
Total Carbohydrate: 12.4 g
Dietary Fiber: 3.3 g
Sugars: 7.5 g
Protein: 1.6 g